About your Search

20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12
. one of my clarion -- four years ago i talked at clarion which is a wonderful science-fiction five week-long six weeklong boot camp and teachers come in and go a week and i did week 4 which i was told was when everybody cries and others break down. they did not have nervous breakdowns which was great. at one point, one of my guys -- can you tell whether your letters going to make it? and i said no. and some of us are brilliant and some of us -- how do you tell? no. ones who are going to make are the ones who write and write and write. some of the ones who are brilliant may have written brilliant stories and never write again. but the ones who get in and they write every day and finish their stories and then write the next one they will make it. i saw him four months ago in arlington as he was nominated for a nebula award and he said you know, it works. he didn't get the award but still very proud of him. my wife and i loved the audio versions and never worked. you are such a terrific voice actor. did you have those voices in mind as you were writing the book? i suppose i did but also ha
to measure in science and engineering when they go to college they're much less likely to get what they call stem degrees in the science and engineering and math degrees if they receive a large preference. a study by friends of mine at the university of virginia found that if you take to students of any color one of whom received a large preferences and one of whom doesn't, the student with a preference has about 40% larger chance of dropping out of science on his path through. the mismatch also affects if with academically inclined students that receive large preferences who with like to become university professors or going to academics sunday, but very predominantly receive low academic grades, clustered at the bottom of the class and decide that academics is not for them. the biggest mismatch experience was in california where the voters passed proposition and we had a large cause i national experiment about what happens when racial preferences are banned from the entire system. the results are extremely clear 21 the bothers. within a half-dozen on the neutrality the number of blacks in
and i'm editor of real clear science.com. my background is microbiology. a friend of mine who became an ob gene why and set i look like a geek in that picture. that is my working in an anaerobic chamber. we grew all sorts of extremely slowly bacteria in that thing. i went to the university of washington in 2004 and got my ph.d. in 2010. i have been in the real world for two years. my personal science philosophy is straight forward and simple. if you are not an expert in his best to accept what is considered mainstream science. science should always come before politics. that means ideology or political parties are not beyond criticism. in my view i quaker team science. i don't come 14 rap or team blew. i think we shall always try to purge anti scientific thinking even if it is from our friends or political allies. so why science left behind? why pick on the left? the media is quick to cover anti scientific belief from conservatives like global warming and evolution. plot macon's made some rather an in lightning comment about pregnancy and for days this was a front-page story about ho
in science and engineering when they go to college they're less likely to get what we call s.t.e.m. degrees if they receive a large preference. a study from the university of virginia found if you take two blacks or students of any color who one receives a large preference and one doesn't, the one that receives preference has a larger chance of dropping out. "mismatch" also affects academically inclined students who receive large preference who like to become university professors or academics. but predominantly receive low academic grades and decide economics is not for them. the biggest "mismatch" experiment was in california where voters passed a proposition with a large experiment of what happened when racial preferences are banned from university systems. it is extremely clear for anyone who played cares to look. within a half-dozen years the number of blacks in the university system has gone up by 30%. the number of blacks receiving a bachelor degrees went up by 70%. the number of degrees for hispanics, gpas of gone up. virtually every outcome has been a dramatic improvement. the colu
a science fiction five-week long, six-week long science-fiction boot camp. and i did week four, which is when everyone cries and has a nervous breakdown spirit and they did indeed do that. which was great. [laughter] at one point, one of my guys said how can you tell? can you tell which of us is going to make it. and i said no. he said, but some of us are brilliant, and can you tell? and i said no. the ones that are going to make it would be the ones that write and write and write. some of the ones who are brilliant have written brilliant stories and never write again, they are the ones who get in there and write everyday and finish their stories. then they write the next ones. and they will make it. i saw him about four months ago in arlington. he was nominated for a nebula award and he said, you know, it works. he didn't get the award, but still very proud of him. [laughter] my wife and i love this very much. thank you very much. i also like to cheat on the voices because of the ones i like are in the tv series. the ones i didn't like, i substituted the ones that were in my head. wh
. our site is doing it because their cars get keyed and science get torn down. >> hi, my name is harry. i love your passion and your honesty all these years. i've seen you on media. and david, i admire him so deeply. mainly for that day she was going be campuses and taking them on right there in those places. i was a student in 1965 at kersten university and i was drawn by democrats into democrats into wanting to help take care of people are hearing the clarence thomas hearings, i switched to republican. the >> that's great. >> after the republicans inability to prosecute clinton all the way, i let them and became an independent and decided that was the best place i could find. i loved what you said about the courage of the black conservative. that's the subject i've been drawn to from the very beginning. it was in my heart in those days as a student, when i was in the march to montgomery, where it all got started. >> is this leading to question? >> i have value of my own, too. i wanted you to comment on the person of thomas soul if you don't mind. [applause] >> i think is the greatest
a republican to of the science union over antagonism. then we can could see any republican future beyond the border. he did later on. as for the unity of the triumph of the republican party since the inception seward had been a major spokesmen for anti-slavery number weighed this from the irrepressible conflict and had to rappel from the assault on the left and the party asking for compromise did even if the most radical did vote they would offset the loss. sell it would become the great union party and as i said lincoln did turn that party etfs before the hostilities did not. yes he viewed the crisis from the partisan perspective but there was the third fundamental reason. the evidence suggests the visceral hatred of slavery. seward without question never gave slavery equality with free them but convinced with the rapid expansion of the free states with burgeoning economic power this overpowers slavery. to become casualties of what he foresaw as inevitable progress after accomplishing his purpose elected a republican seward was quite willing to stop. not selling 10. the territorial issu
at being a geek god, filled with again with science and technology. i'm thinking, how can i get better? i had the sensors encompasses a bluetooth. you have phones in your pocket. i'll bet you could actually sort of fly a plane with this. so i got the kids together and they put it in the plane. it turns out the autopilot starts regulating the state department and can be recognizable by go that day. but what that may be realized is that there's something very exciting going on in what used to be hard to do stuff, electronics and others, others, others, my little discovery in terms of my children got me into the recognition that may be hardwired, maybe physical stuff was something i could do and it was interesting and scary anymore. so i started messing around and learning a little bit and we got a computer board have learned more about sensors and kind of what way down rabbit hole. today i run a chunk from any with a mexican drone factory. i'll say it again, mexican drone in fact true. five years ago i was the dad messing around at the park with my kids and i would put montrose in the earth
, climate change is not even gotten talked about. having all this freakish weather and all the science is so overwhelming about climate, yet you don't see it on the nightly news. is there a story that you wanted to grab of stuff during your tenure at abc in say, we have to cover this war? >> there were several we have had discussions about. actually, one of them was the environment and how we cover the environment. every time we tried to do a prime-time special we would not get a rating, and that led -- one of the chapters are right about this, where i don't come across well, we had leonardo dicaprio at one point, president clinton, and i get killed for it. i did not intend, but we did a prime-time environmental special , and dicaprio was the chairman of earth day that year, and we talk to my that he would make an appearance at the end -- ended up interviewing the president. that was an attempt to try to cover the environment and a serious way and drive an audience. i was concerned, frankly, about our terrorism coverage. we did more than other people did. john miller, our correspondent went
to serve so that one man ended up serving at the st. louis science center. adam burt ended up setting up his own nonprofit. serve with habitat for humanity. a youth hockey coach in football coach. it at the mission continues and did an in the white house with the first lady's office for her joining forces initiative. it ended up becoming a biology teacher for part of her. and what happened was for all of them, they started to serve again and took on this challenge of finding a way to continue to serve on their new frontline. and what we found ed the mission continues is that all of them have been able to serve as inspiration for young people are around the country. and i finished the book, i finish the book with this challenge for young people. you pause over the last page. you don't -- your own life feels fill the possibility. you think about the kind of story that you might tell one day about your life, your love, your service, your ventures. the road before you is long. you will wind up steep hills and down to low valleys. there will be moments of spectacular beauty along the way and
. find a way to continue to serve so that josh ended up serving at the st. louis science center. adam, who was hit by the mortar round set up his own nonprofit. julian served with habitat for humanity, sean became a youth hockey coach and football coach. ian smith did a fellowship at the police continues and then did an internship and the white house with the first lady's office for her joining forces initiative. melissa steinman became a biology teacher, and for all of them, they started to serve again and took on this challenge of finds a way to continue to serve on the new front line. and what we found at the mission continues, is all of them have been able to serve as inspiration for young people around the country. and i finish the book with this challenge for young people. you pause over the last page. your own life feels filled with possibilities. you think about the kind of story that you might tell one day about your life, your love, your service, your adventure. the road before you is long. it will wind up steep hills and down into low valleys. moments of spectacular beauty
? climate change has not gotten talked-about rehab this whether in this science is overwhelming you don't see it on the nightly news to say we have to cover this war? one was the environment every time we tried to do a prime-time special meehan leonardo dicaprio interview president clinton and i was killed for it. we did the prime-time special he was the chairman of earth day i thought he would make an appearance be interviewed the president. that was the attempt. but we did more tears them coverage before 9/11. we did a prime-time special but the military said the biggest concern it is enacted of terrorism of. i wish we had done more. education is not covered in the depth that it should be. some of our difficult to do with television. >> host: how much pressure is there to do entertainment as news? lindsay lohan or the superficiality? to seem that journalism has gone down is there pressure what is the news? >> there was the disagreement with princess diana coverage after she died and peter said it was a terrible idea but then came around. it was a constant battle within myself and is a
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12